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Wheels / Hub Tech Help

 

1. Can I send my parts in to have them built?

Absolutely! We would love to build your wheels for you. All you have to do is package your parts up well and send them to:

Dan's Competition
One Competition Way
Mt. Vernon, IN. 47620
Attn: Customer Service

Make sure to include a note with your contact information and instructions on how you would like your wheels laced.

Note: We do not reuse spokes or nipples. We do not build bent or damaged rims or damaged hubs. If you plan to cut your old spokes out yourself, make sure you remove the rear freewheel from the hub before doing so. If you have any questions please call 1-888-888-DANS.

2. How much does it cost to have Dan's build my wheels?

If you are placing an order with us and you purchase all the wheel components and have the wheels built at the time the original order is placed then the wheel assembly labor is free. If you are sending us parts to have built then there is a $15.00 per wheel fee plus the cost of any additional parts needed and any shipping and handling charges that may occur. If you have any questions please call 1-888-888-DANS.

3. How do I adjust the slack in my KHE Geisha, Alienation Rush, Federal, St Martin Darwin or Stranger Coastersarus freecoaster hub?

To see detailed instructions of the adjutments, click on the link below. Adobe Acrobat Reader is required to view these instructions.

Freecoaster hub adjustment

Click on image for a free download.

4. What are the different lace patterns and there benefits?

There are primarily five different lace patterns, which are radial, 1cross, 2cross, 3cross and 4cross. Generally on a 36 hole wheel 3cross is strongest and on a 48 hole wheel 4 cross is strongest. If you wanted to save some weight you could run a less number cross pattern like a 1cross or 2cross. Some wheels are even built with a radial lace also known as a 0cross. The most common application for a radial lace wheel is a front race wheel where the rider is either very light or very smooth. The reason a 1cross or radial wheel weighs less than a 3cross or 4cross wheel is the spoke length. For instance, if a 48 hole wheel laced 4cross has a 185mm spoke length then that same wheel would use 172mm spoke length if it were laced radial. That is a difference of 13mm per spoke, which is equivalent to removing 3.4 185mm spokes.

5. How do I determine my lace pattern?

You will count the number of times each spoke crosses another spoke, starting just behind the hub flange and work your way to the rim. Here are a couple examples to help you. Click on each wheel to get an enlarged view.

3 Cross Lace
4 Cross Lace
3 Cross Laced Wheel - Click to Enlarge 4 Cross Laced Wheel - Click to Enlarge

6. What are the benefits to running a cassette hub over a freewheel hub?

There are a few reasons to run a cassette hub over a freewheel hub. One reason is the ease of changing rear sprockets. With a freewheel hub you have to have multiple freewheels and sometimes freewheel tools. A freewheel can be very difficult to remove depending on how long it has been installed. On a cassette hub you have cogs that are changed. Most cassette hubs come with multiple sizes of cogs. The tools to remove the cog from your cassette hub are the same for all cogs as long as you are using the same cassette hub. The next reason is reliability. Freewheels go bad over time. Once a freewheel goes bad you have to throw it away and buy a new one. On a cassette hub, the freewheel mechanism is built into the hub and is called a driver. If the driver goes bad it is completely rebuildable. With a cassette hub you have the ability to run very small gearing in the rear. Currently with a cassette hub you can run as small as an 8t cog. The smallest a freewheel hub can go is 13t.

7. What are the advantages to running a smaller gear on my cassette hub?

There are a couple of good advantages to running a small drive train. The first reason is weight savings. With a small rear cog you can run a smaller front sprocket. Smaller means less material, which makes the parts lighter. A smaller front sprocket and rear cog requires less chain than a larger combination. Less chain is always lighter. A smaller drive train is usually up and out of the way. When doing some tricks and stunts, a large drive train can hang down under the bike and be in the way.

8. When would I choose left hand drive over right hand drive?

Running left hand drive moves the sprockets and chain to the left side of the bike. This is good if you use your right pegs the majority of the time and you feel that your drive train is in the way. If you use your left pegs most of the time it may be best to stay with right hand drive.

9. Should I run 36 hole or 48 hole wheels?

48 hole wheels are usually stronger than 36 hole wheels. If you are hard on wheels and have trouble keeping 48 hole wheels true, then 36 hole wheels are not for you. 36 hole wheels are for smooth dialed-in riders.

10. What does the gauge of a spoke refer to?

The gauge of a spoke refers to the diameter of the spoke. The smaller the gauge the larger the diameter will be. For instance a 14g spoke is 2.0mm in diameter and a 15g spoke is 1.8mm in diameter.

11. What is the difference in a straight gauge spoke and a double butted spoke?

A straight gauge spoke is one diameter all the way down the spoke. A double butted spoke changes diameter twice. Usually a double butted spoke will start out at the head of the spoke as 14g, change about 20mm down to 15g and change back to 14g about 20mm before the threads. Basically it is 14g on the ends and 15g through the center.

Staight Gauge Spoke
Double Butted Spoke

12. What are the differences between brass nipples and alloy nipples?

Brass nipples are known to be very strong, come in two colors, black and silver and weigh more than alloy nipples. Alloy nipples are not as strong but they weigh less than brass and they come in a variety of colors.

13. Should I buy 14mm hubs or 3/8" hubs?

The biggest determining factor for this question is your dropout sizes. Check your fork and frame dropouts to determine if they are 14mm or 3/8". 3/8" is really close to 10mm so a 14mm dropout will be about 4mm bigger than a 3/8" dropout. If you are purchasing everything new and don't have a frame and fork yet then consider how hard you ride. If you are really smooth then you may be ok with 3/8" axles. If you are a very hard and extreme rider I would definitely run 14mm axles.

14. Can I make my 3/8" hub 14mm or vice versa?

You cannot put a 14mm axle in a 3/8" hub. You can give your 3/8" axle the appearance of a 14mm axle by using axle converters but this does not increase the strength of the axle. If you have a 14mm hub and need it to fit a 3/8" frame or fork, you can check and see if a 14mm slotted axle is available for that hub. A slotted axle is an axle that will fit a 14mm hub but is machined flat so it will fit in a 3/8" dropout. A 3/8 axle will not fit in a 14mm hub.

15. Can I convert my unsealed hubs to sealed?

No. Unsealed hubs have to stay unsealed and sealed hubs have to stay sealed.

16. How do I know what sealed bearings I need for my sealed hub?

If you remove the bearing from the hub there should be little numbers on the seal of the bearing. These numbers are the bearing numbers. All you have to do is write these numbers down and give us a call, then we will match your bearing numbers up with a bearing that we have in stock. If you have any questions please call 1-888-888-DANS.

17. What does the number 1.75 on rims mean?

1.75 on rims stands for the smallest size tire that will fit on that rim. This does not mean that the rim will measure 1.75" wide. A 1.75 rim will not accept a tire that is a 1.5 although a 1.5 rim will accept a tire that is 1.75.

18. Will a 20 x 1 1/8" rim work on my 20" bike?

No. A 20 x 1 1/8" rim is bigger in diameter than a regular 20 x 1.75" rim. A 20 x 1 1/8"rim was designed for mini race bikes.

19. Can I run a left hand drive freewheel on my flip flop hub?

No. A flip flop hub is a hub that will accept a 16T or bigger right hand drive freewheel on one side and a 15t or smaller right hand drive freewheel on the other side. If you are wanting to run left hand drive your hub has to be a left hand drive hub. Flip Flop hubs are not left hand drive.

 

 

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